QuickEdit (especially paired with Bulk Actions) can do a lot of things, but generally the best way to familiarize you with it is to go through a few example use cases. Likely these will inspire other uses for the tools specific to your business.

Beginner

“I'm redoing my Shipping costs. I need a list of all SKUs listed on Amazon that have an Item Price above $5. How can I get this?”

  1. In the QuickEdit view, click Add Column on the top right, then search for “Item Price” and select that attribute, which will add it as a column.

  2. Click the filter icon on the Item Price column, set it to Greater Than for the filter, and enter a value of 5. Uncheck the box for “Inclusive.” (With Inclusive checked this is basically a Greater Than or Equals To filter which will include 5. With it unchecked, it would only include 5.01 and higher.)

  3. Click Add Column on the top right again, search for “Amazon Listed”, and then select that attribute to add it as a column.


  4. Click the filter icon on the Amazon Listed column and set it to Is True. This will filter the list to only shows SKUs that are actively listed to that channel (Amazon).

  5. Click Export View on the top. Your exported view will appear in your Export History.

Easy, right? Read on for more complex examples!

Intermediate

“I got an alert that we need to delist all Apple products from Amazon immediately. How can I do this ASAP?”

  1. In the QuickEdit view, click Add Column on the top right, then search for “Brand” and select that attribute, which will add it as a column.

  2. Click the filter icon on the Brand column and set it to CONTAINS “apple” and then check the box for Ignore Case (This means we would catch APPLE, apple, Apple, etc. and not just “apple” exactly in all lowercase) then click the check to confirm the filter.

  3. Click the link on the top right for Create Bulk Action.

What we’ve done here is used QuickEdit to build the filter for a Bulk Action, so the change to attributes we are about to make will occur only on SKUs that meet the criteria we set in the QuickEdit page.

In the Label field you can name your bulk action. Naming bulk actions makes it easier to see what you did with them in the past. Something clear and direct like “Delist All Apple SKUs from Amazon” works great.

4. Click the large + icon near the bottom and select Set Value at the top

5. Click Select Field and search for “Amazon Listed” and we will see the “Listed” value for each Amazon integration we have in this account. Select the desired channels Listed value.

6. Under To Value you can set this to 0 or false and click Add.

7. Click Create on the bottom right. (Your bulk action will be listed in Bulk Action History with the name you gave it.)

A bulk action will begin and it will set all Apple branded SKUs in your catalog to delist from Amazon.

Advanced

“I need to make sure my prices on Amazon are consistently 10% lower than they are on all my other channels. I have multiple VAs that change pricing of hundreds of SKUs daily. How can I automate this?”

Since this affects ALL SKUs, we could do this Bulk Action with no filter at all, but we will add an extra layer of specificity, where we will only add the Amazon Price Override for SKUs that are actually listed to Amazon. (NOTE: Limiting the scope of your bulk action will also make it run faster.)

  1. In the QuickEdit view, click Add Column on the top right, then search for “Amazon Listed” and select that attribute for your specific Amazon integration, which will add it as a column. There is a “Listed” attribute for every channel. If it's set to 1 or true it's Listed, if it's 0 or false it's delisted.

  2. Click the filter icon on the Amazon Listed column and set it to Is True.

  3. Click the link on the top right for Create Bulk Action.

In the Label field you can name your bulk action, and naming bulk actions makes it easier to see what you did with them in the past. In this case something like “10% Discount on All Amazon Pricing” would work fine.

4. Click the large + icon near the bottom and select Set Value at the top

5. Click Select Field and search for “Amazon Price Override” and we will see the override value for each Amazon integration we have in this account. Select the desired channel's price override field.

Here's where this one deviates from the previous examples: you can perform basic mathematical operations within actions, even based on the value within most SKU attributes if they're numerical.

What we will do here is take the item price, reduce it to 90% of its original value, then set that reduced value as the Amazon Price Override. This means Zentail will send the reduced price to Amazon but the regular Item Price for all other channels.

6. Click Insert Field Name and search for Item Price and select it.

7. It should appear in the field as item_price and to make sure the Price Override is always 10% less than the Item Price, the math will simply be *0.9, so item_price*0.9 is what should be present in that field when complete.

Now, if we ran this action currently, it would only do this action once. If the VAs came in and altered Item Price, that wouldn’t update our overrides and then our pricing will be wrong. We need to automate a daily checking of price values and then to update them based on new pricing values entered since the last time it was run. So there are a couple more steps ahead:

8. Click Schedule this Bulk Action near the bottom left.

9. Set the values that appear here to “Run at the Beginning of every Day

10. Click Create on the bottom right.

Your Bulk Action will be listed in Bulk Actions Run History with the name you gave it each time it runs.

In addition, you will see under Catalog > Automation > Automation Rules that there is a new entry at the top. This action will now run immediately by default, and then will run every morning until you tell it to stop by toggling it from Active to Inactive. You can also manually run this action at any time by clicking on the arrow icon, so if you know a bunch of pricing changes were just made you can click the play button to run it right away. (This will not interrupt its next automatic run.)


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